Apple II on Raspberry Pi

C’mon let’s all die of dysentery on the Oregon Trail!

Building and installing the linapple-pie Apple IIe emulator is relatively easy on the Raspberry Pi:

sudo apt install libcurl4-openssl-dev libzip-dev zlib1g-dev libsdl1.2-dev libsdl-gfx1.2-dev libsdl-image1.2-dev libsdl-sound1.2-dev build-essential git
git clone https://github.com/dabonetn/linapple-pie.git
cd linapple-pie/src
make
sudo make install

This also works on an x86_64 Ubuntu machine. It does also install on a PocketCHIP (even if it takes a really long time) but I can’t get the display resolution to fit correctly.

Raspberry Pi Zero: avoiding random network addresses in Gadget Mode

The Raspberry Pi Zero can be set up to appear as one of several USB OTG “gadgets” if you plug it into another computer. The most popular setting seems to be the virtual network gadget that turns your Zero into a computer on the end of your USB cable. Andrew Mulholland’s guide Raspberry Pi Zero – Programming over USB! (Part 2) (along with his super-short simple guide) seems to be the definitive source on how to set these modes up.

One problem, though, is that the Zero would show up on different network addresses every time it was restarted. The changing addresses made ssh access no fun at all. A suggestion on the Raspberry Pi forum helped me come up with a solution. On the Raspberry Pi Zero, run this command once:

echo 'options g_ether host_addr='$(dmesg | awk '/: HOST MAC/{print $NF}')' dev_addr='$(dmesg | awk '/: MAC/{print $NF}') | sudo tee /etc/modprobe.d/g_ether.conf

This will set the USB port’s hardware addresses to a fixed value, and you should always get a connection on the same IP address if it’s available.

How my Raspberry Pi Zero appears on my Ubuntu machine

Can’t think of this as anything other than the Simon Quinlank Building #hobbyfools

Can’t think of this as anything other than the Simon Quinlank Building #hobbyfools

Instagram filter used: Lo-fi

Photo taken at: Seneca@york

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If one should find oneself in the middle of the Mississippi River on a New Year’s Day …

If one should find oneself in the middle of the Mississippi River on a New Year’s Day …

Instagram filter used: Willow

Photo taken at: Chain of Rocks Bridge

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8x U+2764 “Heavy Black Heart” makes a 15th century Iznik (Turkey) floral design

8x U+2764 “Heavy Black Heart” makes a 15th century Iznik (Turkey) floral design

Instagram filter used: Lo-fi

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It seems that being under the blanket is an important part of playing Nintendo here

It seems that being under the blanket is an important part of playing Nintendo here

Instagram filter used: Lo-fi

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Emulating a Mac IIx on Raspberry Pi

Yup, I have a failing for 512×384 screens …

Running Mini vMac on a Raspberry Pi is hardly news. But maybe running it as a colour Mac II is. The screen size I’ve chosen is closer to a Color Classic, for no other reason that I like it.

To build a Mac II-capable version of Mini vMac, you’ll need the Alpha source code. You’ll also need a working Mini vMac setup, as it uses a 68k Mac program to set up the source. Pretty much any basic setup and bootable disk will run this okay:

Mini vMac building on an emulated Mac Classic booting from the System 7 Network Access floppy image (no, I couldn’t boot from Classic’s hidden boot ROM disk)

The build options I chose are:

-t larm -ccs -m II -hres 512 -vres 384 -depth 3 -mf 2 -magnify 1 -em-cpu 2 -mem 8M

I’ve chosen to swap the Ctrl key with the Command (⌘) key, as most non-Mac keyboards work better with this.

The build program will export a file out/minivmac-3.5.0-larm.tar that you can unpack into the full source code. It’s a really simple build, and fast, too.

Now you’ll need a Mac IIx ROM image (which I’m not supposed to help you find, but it’s an easy search) and OS image disks from the Mini vMac System Software page. Have fun!